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Brazil: Sometimes it sinks
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  • Well, unless you have an undercover agent in Brazil, I can´t be so sure ;o)

    You do not need one, as you can see fundamentals.

  • I was born in Brazil and live here for the last 37 years. I guess I know something about it ;o)

  • I was born in Brazil and live here for the last 37 years. I guess I know something about it ;o)

    Of course you know, but most of your current views are formed by local media and talks.

  • Really nice to know that besides camera related stuff Vitaliy knows a lot of Brazil intrinsic political and economic mechanics of our so beloved country ...

  • @Cid @labalbi

    How about write your detailed view here, it can be very useful for PV members?

  • Vitaliy... You just said to my fellow that his view is formed by local media as he was a brainless dumb ! So its pointless to argue with you ...

  • You just said to my fellow that his view is formed by local media as he was a brainless dumb ! So its pointless to argue with you ...

    It is always good to read and stop emotions. I said that MOST of his views on Brazil fundamentals are formed by media and talks. And nothing about "brainless dumb", as if you work hard and watch media - you are not dumb, you just do not have enough information.

    Thing I asked is to write about local, personal experience, things that are wrong and that are right as you think.

  • @Vitaliy_Kiselev Whenever its possible I look for foreign info as well, its healthy ;o) As for my "local" experience, in everyday life, it seems we are almost back to the 80's, when Brazil suffered an economic hangover caused by the Military Dictatorship. The Military administration kept loaning money from the IMF in the 70's to create a fake sense of development known as the "Brazilian Miracle". When the dictatorship faded, the miracle turned into a economic nightmare: abusive and galoping inflation, unemployment, low salaries (apart from the politics, of course), the elite was living on speculation and not producing with the dolarized economy, the majority of the population had no acess to credit creating a black market of loan sharks... many of these things are coming back now. As you might see, I don't miss the 80's ;o)

  • @Cid

    Big thanks for this post.

    Why do you think it is happening? Only political issues as you write? What changed so much in a year so president and leading party lost all their ratings?

  • @Vitaliy_Kiselev Our greatest problem (and that goes back 500 years in our history as a colony) is the endemic and cultural corruption. Regardless of ideological colors. Unfortunately, the labor party lost the opportunity to make something different from the oligarchy and in the last 12 years they crippled the public resources in a wild way. Every week we are watching the hearings and trials of businessmen and former political characters (like Chief of Staff José Dirceu) involved in the "Lavajato" scandal that shows how they operated (and still operates) a net of millionare bribes and the sort. And that is only the tip of the iceberg. No country can develop in such way...

  • Our greatest problem (and that goes back 500 years in our history as a colony) is the endemic and cultural corruption.

    I think it is not something unique, and Brazil is not better or worse considering people.

    Look at the stories in other countries like India and the scope of corruption.

    labor party lost the opportunity to make something different from the oligarchy and in the last 12 years they crippled the public resources in a wild way

    Why you even though that party formed and sponsored by bourgeoisie will make something to hurt the owners?

    Where are examples of some party doing evolutionary changes and reducing oligarchy power?

    No country can develop in such way...

    Why?

  • You're right, corruption isn't unique to us. But is a BIG issue here anyway.

    Former uruguaian president Mujica seems to have done an intersting job there. Not perfect, of corse, but much more positive than what we get in Brazil. And if you look closer, the background of Mujica and Dilma have many similarities.

    I don't believe that a corrupt state can be considered trully "developed"...

  • I don't believe that a corrupt state can be considered trully "developed"...

    You mean that we do not have truly developer countries? :-)

    Corruption is natural thing in any (even best!) big hierarchical bureaucratic systems. Sometimes it makes horrible things (most of the time). But sometimes it is vital for system function (if rules are stupid or you just can not physically meet requirements).

    My point is that presidents and parties represent interests of ones who own them (ruling class), not voters. So, it is stupid to expect any real wars with oligarchs.

  • Yes, we don't have truly developed "humanity" ;o)

    Your point about stupid rules and corruption is very interesting. I would love to hear about it!

    I don't want to sound like an uthopic revolutionary, wich I'm not. I´ve voted for the right and the left in many cases. The problem is that both turned out to be the same... or worse!

    Apart from many opinions, I don't think that the capitalist system is the problem itself. But the people who runs it.

    We could live in a capitalist country with income distribution, without big class conflict, without war, if people wanted to...

  • I´ve voted for the right and the left in many cases. The problem is that both turned out to be the same... or worse!

    Of course they are same or worse, it is ALWAYS same experience across all capitalist countries.

    I don't think that the capitalist system is the problem itself. But the people who runs it.

    It is very big error.

    We could live in a capitalist country with income distribution, without big class conflict, without war, if people wanted to...

    Nope, state is dictatorship of ruling class :-)

  • Ok, perhaps I'm a little uthopic and revolutionary ;o)

  • Ok, perhaps I'm a little uthopic and revolutionary ;o)

    Exactly reverse, you like evolution (no, recent so called "revolutions" across the world are not revolutions as ruling class and elites are same) and many views are based on things you hear and see. As for most people.

  • image

    Plus

    A strike at Brazil’s state owned oil giant Petrobras has reduced crude production by more than 20 percent, a union leader said on Tuesday (Wednesday in Manila). The strike began October 24 over demands for wage increases.

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  • The real fight is between the two parties in charge: PT and PMDB (president Dilma and president of the chamber of deputies Eduardo Cunha). The PMDB party even released a government plan while the crisis increases and we are still three years away from the next presidential election...

  • The PMDB party even released a government plan while the crisis increases and we are still three years away from the next presidential election...

    And?

    You mean that removing one old puppy and putting new one will make you happier? :-)

    Real fight is between two classes, and two parties fight is TV show.

  • This is not good news at all. The PMDB party is worse than PT, been in power for the last 33 years and it is one of the responsible for what is hapening. They´re just pretending otherwise...

  • Marx grasped this essence of capitalist democracy splendidly .... he said that the oppressed are allowed once every few years to decide which particular representatives of the oppressing class shall represent and repress them in parliament!

  • "Democracy is the worst form of government, except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time." - Churchill

  • "Democracy is the worst form of government, except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time." - Churchill

    You forget to add part that this guy prefer to omit - it is best only for bourgeoisie :-)

  • When oilworkers began their strike Nov. 1, their main grievance regarded Petrobras' plans to cut investments and sell assets to bring its massive $130 billion debt under control.

    Petrobras on Thursday reported a $1.01 billion third-quarter loss, the third loss in the past five quarters.

    Otherwise it is all pure corruption. :-)