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Micro 4/3 to Nikon F Lens Adapter
  • Hi guys! I bought this Micro 4/3 to Nikon F Lens Adapter (link below) a few months ago after reading some good comments on the web.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&_trksid=p4340.l2557&hash=item3a6f48da38&item=250975148600&nma=true&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&rt=nc&si=DSMeVaUnMs2z8gO0A%252Bch%252BSZlI60%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc#ht_2566wt_1156

    There is definitely a little play on the lens and camera connections but it wasn't that much of an issue before I bought my follow focus. Now the shift of lens is quite visible (and annoying) when I use the follow focus. What I noticed is that the play on the lens side is mainly because the lock of the adapter is slightly smaller than the little hole on the back of the lens and the fit isn't that tight.

    I found the Metabones and Voigtlander adapters (which looks like they are pretty much the same, apart from the price range) and on the Metabones website they do say that the adapter has a "Precise fit and solid connection - lens has no play, gap or wiggling when mounted on adapter and no adjustments are required to fit your lens".

    I was wondering if, from your experience, you guys could confirm if these adapters are really top notch (with no play at all) or if know another brands I could consider. My current adapter is in the same price range as the Metabones so it'd be great to hear from you before I risk spending another 100 bucks on something that might not solve the problem.

    Cheers

  • 9 Replies sorted by
  • @tnt2000

    Check other topics in same category, you could find fixes and tips how to make it better :-)

  • I have that one too and I had to switch to a tripod mount one that locks another way. When i get back from Prague, I'll send you the link. Think i paid $30 for it as well. There's a Kipon one that works really well too.

  • Oh, my bad. I don't have that one but I know what you're talking about with the poor locking tab. Non of my adapters that lock that way work well. IMO, you shouldn't have to fiddle around with it when it costs that much. My $30 works just fine and has the iris ring on it so I can use my Tokina 11-16 as well.

  • I have Voigtlander Nikon F to m4/3 adapter that I have paid 170$ for, and it focuses past infinity, very slightly thou. Besides that it is very solid tight fit. I use huge Vivitar 70-210 on it and it doesn't vobble.

  • I use Kipon N/G-m4/3 this have aperture ring too, no need for de-clicking :-) It works even with Nikon AF new lenses where you can adjust aperture with the help of ring. Be sure to order one with stainless steel springs on bayonet ... (not brass the old ones ... )

  • Also here is my video review on Kipon adapters ... Nikon to MFT

  • I've have the Fotodiox Nikon G adapter, which uses an aperture ring design similar to the Kipon adapter. In my experience, none of these mechanical aperture rings are useful for anything but experimentation. The problem is not in the machining of the adapter, it's an inherent flaw in the design that makes precise aperture adjustment unreliable and unrepeatable in practice.

    All Nikon F-mount lenses, whether fully manual or fully automatic, use the same aperture control mechanism - a small mechanical lever that protrudes from the rear of the lens. This lever is connected directly to the lens iris and moves over a very short arc. It is designed to be controlled by an auto-iris actuator in the camera body. This classic mechanical iris mechanism found in Nikon lenses (and Canon FD lenses as well) is very different from the electronic iris used in modern Canon EOS lenses.

    The fatal flaw with the Nikon G adapters is that the precise positioning of this mechanical lever is far too finicky to work reliably with a freely rotating external ring. The slightest movement of the ring causes a large change in aperture and without click-stops, there's no way to calibrate or stabilize it to any repeatable setting (except wide open). You literally have to guess at the aperture each time you use it, and it's impossible to set it in exactly the same position for repeated shots. Nikon G lenses were never designed to be manually controlled in this manner.

  • @LPowell , thank you, that was a great information. I don't own any of modern G lenses for Nikon so I could not test it. I really like the build quality of these Kipon adapters and it works great with AIS lenses ... You are right the aperture ring is not that precise, you can just "gues" the aperture ...

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