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Either go 8K 120Hz or SKIP it...
  • Either go 8K 120Hz or SKIP it... Why?

    I see a lot of early companies pimping "cheaper" 8K 60p solutions...

    My advice: SKIP it!

    I was one of the first adopters of 4K 24p, and believe me when I say a decent 4K 120 Hz display has more legs than a cheap 8K 60p, so wait back with what you have and put your money on 8K 120Hz when it hits your price point...

    Posted from a recent market research analysis...

    " research notes that Innolux started developing 8K panels in 2017, and produced its first 8K LCD TV display (60Hz, 65-inch) in Q4 2017, which will be supplied to Sharp and to Chinese TV makers in the start. Sharp also mass-produced its first 8K LCD TV display, a 70-inch model, in Q4 2017 to support the Sharp TV brand in China, IHS Markit pointed out, adding that Samsung and Sony also plan to release “flagship” 8K TV models later this year, and will “consume almost all” 120Hz 8K panels from Innolux, AUO and Samsung Display, with sizes ranging from 65 inches to 85 inches.

    LG Display also introduced an 88-inch 8K OLED TV display this week at CES in Las Vegas.

    The HDMI Forum and the HDMI Licensing Authority are likewise preparing for the 8K era with HDMI 2.1, a new spec for connectors and cables (released on Nov. 28, 2017) that will support resolutions up to 10K, data rates of 48 Gbps, as well as Dynamic HDR and other advanced features.

    “This year, you’re actually going to see some commercial products” supporting 8K, Rob Tobias, president of HDMI LA, said at a press event XX at CES that provided an update on HDMI 2.1 efforts. He noted that the move to 8K will be driven in part by video productions being planned for the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo and the 2022 Winter Games to be hosted in Beijing."

    source:

    http://www.multichannel.com/news/content/2018-mark-starting-point-8k-displays-ihs-markit/417461

  • 9 Replies sorted by
  • “As UHD has rapidly replaced full HD in the super large-sized TV display market, panel makers are willing to supply differentiated products with higher resolution and improve profit margin with premium products,” Ricky Park, director at IHS Markit, said in a statement. “Year 2018 will become the first year of the 8K resolution TV display.”

    image

    Who actually wrote all this article?

    The research notes that Innolux started developing 8K panels in 2017, and produced its first 8K LCD TV display (60Hz, 65-inch) in Q4 2017, which will be supplied to Sharp and to Chinese TV makers in the start. Sharp also mass-produced its first 8K LCD TV display, a 70-inch model, in Q4 2017 to support the Sharp TV brand in China, IHS Markit pointed out, adding that Samsung and Sony also plan to release “flagship” 8K TV models later this year, and will “consume almost all” 120Hz 8K panels from Innolux, AUO and Samsung Display, with sizes ranging from 65 inches to 85 inches.

    Whole point of PV is scientific view on things. And this is utter craptastic view.

    Unfortunately, science tells us that you need very large TV (like 130" for normal viewing and 80" for closeup monitor) for 8K to be even remotely viable.

    Actually, in years it is almost no content in 4K 60fps, and literally none for 120fps.

    Also, it is reason why people still are fine watching SD and 720p HD content at 24-30fps. It is because our brain is not video camera, instead it is extremely complex associative machine that actually makes up most of content you think you see.

    sa1451.jpg
    543 x 402 - 26K
  • Not so quick, source was posted at bottom of top post...

  • @NickBen

    You noticed that my first citation is actually from your source? As well as chart.

    Actually chart that is really bogus here, because they did not understood that it actually mean.

  • 65" is reasonable for a "close" viewing 8K monitor (think four stacked 32" 4K Monitors)...

    and by the way Nvidia is already pushing 65" 4K 120Hz gaming panels via their partners for gaming...

    https://www.geforce.com/whats-new/articles/bfgd-big-format-gaming-display

  • 15% Market penetration of Total Panel Shipping supply of Size 60"+ by 2023 seems like solid conservative estimate... 5 years from now...

    You see that as too optimistic?

  • @NickBen

    About NVidia I know :-) - http://www.personal-view.com/talks/discussion/18678/nvidia-to-offer-65-monitors-for-video-editing#Item_1

    Just never mix gaming and watching other content.

    Idea of 120-144Hz gaming monitors is to make game more natural by reducing feedback error issues, same as VR must be. Brain work completely different if you passively consume content. Some guys did not understand it making 48-60fps movies experiments and they tanked 9despite 3D being really more easy at this framerates).

  • @NickBen

    It is some stupid analytics view.

    As you need to look at factories. And in reality as 40-42" 4K panel manufacturing is low it will be problem. As they will need to supply 4x55" size panels or 110".
    Also note that many factories literally can't do such large panels.

    8K penetration will be low.
    Plus it will have major economic issues of capitalism flushing it further.

  • @Vitaliy_Kiselev I do not disagree about framerates for cinematic display, whereas 8K 120Hz is for realism/live event/broadcast

    A couple other opinions besides my own:

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnarcher/2018/01/11/why-sonys-8k-10000-nit-85-inch-tv-is-the-best-ive-ever-seen/#6c044b4c2705

    http://www.avsforum.com/best-ces-2018-sony-10000-nit-display/

    That last article link is from Scott Wilkinson of AVSFORUM.com and the Podcast Home Theater Geeks, whom I highly respect and has interviewed almost everybody from all sides when it comes to Display technology scams vs honest groundbreaking display tech... if you watch his weekly past podcasts, and I think you'd agree he is one of the best out there...

  • Yep, actually I checked Scott more last week, as I learn from other CES videos

    He used same recorder as we do (Tascam DR-10X), but different mike - Sennheiser MD46 (good for fast exhibition sound, but require experienced interviewer as it is hard to fix misplacing of mike)

    In Dolby’s initial research into HDR, a luminance level of 10,000 nits was determined to be the maximum that most people could tolerate comfortably. And because there were no displays that could come anywhere close to producing 10,000 nits—other than the custom rig that focused the light output from a DCI projector onto a 24″ screen for Dolby’s research—it seemed to leave a lot of room for growth in future displays.
    It cannot pump out 10,000 nits from a full-screen 100% white field, which would be truly blinding.

    Actually I believe it is inaccurate. It is absolutely no problem to make very dense backlight that has local 10000 nits for short period of time.

    Whole issue with HDR is margins, capitalism in other words. This guys want to sell you multiple TVs while also get their income via patenting everything possible.

    In reality HDR TV is just same cheap panel with different backlight.