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RODELink Digital Wireless Audio System
  • It is digital wireless audio system, works in super crowded 2.4GHz band, uses 128-bit encrypted digital transmission sent on two channels simultaneously. Audio is transmitted in 24-bit/44.1k digital forma, max distance is around 100 meters .

    Transmitter+reciever set will be $399

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1115091-REG/rode_rodlnk_fm_rodelink_wireless_filmmaker_kit.html

    http://www.rodemic.com/wireless

  • 24 Replies sorted by
  • Good thing I didn't jump on the used audio technica system 10 because this systems is looking like one for me. For the price and features, this system is looking good, waiting on a review. I like how it can be power with batteries or USB from a power station.

  • I suggest to check http://www.personal-view.com/talks/discussion/11038/sony-uwp-d-system#Item_2 instead.

    First, build quality is superb. And it an be had for around $420-440 is you patient.

    Second, you never want 2.4Ghz audio product in high destiny places. It is impossible to predict issues with them, starting from bad microwave oven and up to 20 routers fighting for channels.

  • I will buy a sony-uwpd for $420-440 but where? I am also banking on the rodes' claim that it keeps hoping through frequencies to maintain a rock solid reliable signal even in the busiest 2.4GHz environment and ensures that you audio is reliable and secure as a cable connection. Now that's a big claim. PS, Will wait for reviews to see if this could be true.

  • I will buy a sony-uwpd for $420-440 but where?

    ebay. sometimes deals pop up in other places.

    I am also banking on the rodes' claim that it keeps hoping through frequencies to maintain a rock solid reliable signal even in the busiest 2.4GHz environment and ensures that you audio is reliable and secure as a cable connection.

    It is not first of such claims, 2.4Ghz band allowed for Wi-Fi use is pretty narrow and super crowded. Hopping and such won't save you if it'll be issues.

  • Hello,

    @Vitaliy_Kiselev I did a search for rodelink and nothing came up, so I started the thread you closed earlier...

    @ Everyone Could anyone tell me what´s up with this 44,1KHz spec.? "Audio is transmitted in 24-bit/44.1k digital...". How can this work together with a recorder set to 48KHz or 96KHz?

    Clearly I am misunderstanding something here... ;)

    Thanks!

  • "Audio is transmitted in 24-bit/44.1k digital...". How can this work together with a recorder set to 48KHz or 96KHz?

    Perfectly. As output is analog. No one hears anything above 22KHz, so you can record at 48Khz or 96Khz, makes no difference.

  • No hears anything over 5-10 Mhz frequency generally. But the 48khz and 96khz refer to sampling. Are you stating that the human ear cannot differentiate between any sampling greater than 22KHz ?

  • No hears anything over 5-10 Mhz frequency generally.

    What?

    The commonly stated range of human hearing is 20 Hz to 20 kHz.[4][5][note 1] Under ideal laboratory conditions, humans can hear sound as low as 12 Hz.[6] Humans are most sensitive to (i.e. able to discern at lowest intensity) frequencies between 2,000 and 5,000 Hz.[7] Individual hearing range varies according to the general condition of a human's ears and nervous system. The range shrinks during life, usually beginning at around age of eight with the upper frequency limit being reduced. Women typically experience a lesser degree of hearing loss than men, with a later onset. Men have approximately 5 to 10 dB greater loss in the upper frequencies by age 40.[

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hearing_range#Humans

    But the 48khz and 96khz refer to sampling. Are you stating that the human ear cannot differentiate between any sampling greater than 22KHz ?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nyquist%E2%80%93Shannon_sampling_theorem

  • Humans (Males) can differentiate up to 2MHz(sampling). Not because of range, but because of time difference of a sound arriving between left and right ears.

    As an experiment, have someone stand 5m behind you and click their fingers. Now have them move 0.3 left or right and click again. Most men will detect the movement, and most will know which direction the movement was in.

    Now you can calculate the difference in arrival times. (root(5^2 + 0.15^2) - 5)/340 = 0.0000066 Seconds Now you can do the same for the new position, then look at the difference which approximates to the smallest time difference a human can discern. Twice the inverse of this (because Nyquist) is the sampling rate you'd need to achieve. (Someone could check the maths here, I'm not getting the same results as I expected :( I actually get a sample rate of 600Khz )

    I believe this to be the reason vinyl and tape can sound better than CD's because of the micro timing preserved in the grooves and analogue tape.

  • Humans (Males) can differentiate up to 2MHz(sampling). Not because of range, but because of time difference of a sound arriving between left and right ears.

    If you search good you'll find previous discussion on this.

    As an experiment, have someone stand 5m behind you and click their fingers. Now have them move 0.3 left or right and click again. Most men will detect the movement, and most will know which direction the movement was in.

    Check http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Head-related_transfer_function

    Binaural recording encoded with usual sampling is elementary counter example :-)

    I believe this to be the reason vinyl and tape can sound better than CD's because of the micro timing preserved in the grooves and analogue tape.

    Here I have no words. Instead I suggest you to read any serious publication considering measurements of both this "amazing" formats.

    Btw, considering binaural thing. I have LiveScribe pen that comes with headphones with binaural mikes that you insert in your ears. Their idea is that as you are later listening to same recording you can recognize things much much better.

  • @Vitaliy_Kiselev

    You say "... output is analog. No one hears anything above 22KHz, so you can record at 48Khz or 96Khz, makes no difference."

    Analog transmission would make perfect sense to me if Rode wouldn´t state 44.1 KHz digital, ... that's my whole point.

  • Analog transmission would make perfect sense to me if Rode wouldn´t state 44.1 KHz digital, ... that's my whole point.

    I think you are very confused.

    Here is how it works.

    Input on transmitter->ADC->Digital transmission at 44Khz sampling->DAC at receiver-> analog output

    For your recorder it is nothing digital in it, as all he is able to see is analog output.

  • Thanks, got it! :)

  • Audio quality for me is the number one priority regardless of price, design and ease of use. The RodeLink produces fantastic results and I was very happy with the audio quality. A small part of me was expecting the audio quality to be just average given the low price point, but I was pleasantly surprised. I have used a lot of radio mics over the years at varying price points and to me the RodeLink performs as well as systems costing far more money.

    http://www.newsshooter.com/2015/04/30/rodelink-digital-wireless-system-first-impressions/

    Note that Rode is sponsor and partner of the site who wrote overview.

  • I'm not sponsored by Rode, nor do I think everything they do is golden. But I did a brief test of this system and I have to say I'm impressed enough to order it. The longest part of setting up was inserting the AA batteries and connecting the microphone. While it's not a DPA, the mic does perform well and delivers an even tone. Without line of sight and going through four walls, we got about 40 yards before the signal started to cut out. Also set up the subject outside in a fairly brisk wind, under a commercial air vent, and with a lot of surrounding construction noise. The subjects voice cut through nicely and although I wouldn't suggest recording in these circumstances, the audio is usable and could be cleaned up to an extent. Testing done in midtown Manhattan.

  • The subjects voice cut through nicely and although I wouldn't suggest recording in these circumstances, the audio is usable and could be cleaned up to an extent. Testing done in midtown Manhattan.

    Test it on some tech exhibition or in the university campus. But tech shop also can work. With huge number of Bluetooth and Wi-Fi equipment.

  • Yeah, Javits Center during a full on exhibition would be a good test. There is a show there early in the week and perhaps I can get in if I still have access to the system.

  • @stoneinapond

    IT can be good idea to test all more or less popular 2.4GHz systems, like cheap Boya, Audio Technica, Rode and also Line 6.

  • Perfectly. As output is analog. No one hears anything above 22KHz, so you can record at 48Khz or 96Khz, makes no difference.

    High sampling rate has no audible difference to the human ear, but the extra headroom is useful for post processing.

  • Just got the email from B&H saying they're in stock now: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1115091-REG/rode_rodlnk_fm_rodelink_wireless_filmmaker_kit.html

    Wondering which to go for of Audio-Technica System 10 or Rode RodeLink? They're very similar in price, which to go for and why?

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1060929-REG/audio_technica_atw_1701_l_system_10_digtal_wireless.html

  • I opted for the Rodelink based on reviews, mostly backed by video/audio tests. Given that the lavalier itself sells for $250 I could not help but be impressed by the quality of audio the $150 wireless unit is capable of outputting. Apparently the units will run for over 24 hrs with fresh AA batteries (Tascam should poach their engineers...) This was an easy choice for me.

  • I'd like to use the Rodelink with the Rode NTG2 microphone. Any experience on how the in camera recording quality to a GH4 would be?