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H.265 HEVC topic. Same quality, half file size.
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  • @igorek7

    Another one? Ouch. Sad thing no one will use it.

    But seem to use interesting ideas.

  • @Vitaliy_Kiselev I don't think they aim at the mass market. Like with FLAC, which got support from audiophiles, their hopes I think to gain enough market penetration to be supported where it needs to be. At the same time, the commercial smaller lossy video codecs would be used by most people.

  • First actual H.265 products are announced:

    LG has announced an expansion to its ultra high-definition 4K line of TVs, this time with full-backlit LED 55-inch and 65-inch models. In addition, there has also been unveiled an 84-inch UHD model, which is the first to be made available to buyers in the United States.

    The TVs feature a picture resolution of 3840 x 2160, as well as the Tru-Ultra HD engine that upscales content via a four-step process. In addition, the LA9700 utilized an H.265 HEVC (high-efficiency video coding) decoder, which will make the sets compatible with new 4K standards that may be implemented in the future for streaming and broadcast.

    The first production units will provide this decoding in a USB dongle, but as the new standard becomes more widely implemented, H.265 will be built into the sets themselves.

    Via: http://www.slashgear.com/lg-unveils-la9700-series-4k-ultra-hd-led-55-inch-and-65-inch-tvs-11290175/

  • Listen, was there ever a TV or standalone playback device (such as the WDTV media player) with support for a high bitrate main profile 1080p video? I am all for new technology, but doesn't it feel as if manufacturers are once again using that technology as a marketing tool to increase their profits? Has anyone even seen the beauty of 100Mbps AVC or hell, even MPEG-2 50Mbps 1080p on a proper display? Are we back again with eyecandy VS actual content? First there was the push for 3D and how it was going to improve our lives x100 and even do our laundry and fold the clothes, and now we got 4K and H.265.. do I need a new TV and media player, again?

    It is consumer device, so do not require any "high bitrate main profile 1080p video". And modern TVs do not require any media players, as they can play themselfs anything up to Blu Ray bitrates without issues.

  • The latest updates to H.265 are pretty astounding: http://www.eoshd.com/content/11534/new-h-265-codec-test-prores-4444-quality-1-file-size

    Sure it's not RAW, but for events, documentary work, and any kind of filming with extended recording times, this looks like a very compelling format. But really where it looks like it'll shine is output. Being able to broadcast / share videos online that are 4K+ at PR444 quality and yet smaller than h.264 is downright incredible.

  • @Sangye

    I suggest to avoid Voldemort hideout on technical stuff :-)

    I can see this HEVC technology coming to stills too. As the image quality of the sensor advances and megapixels increase north of 36MP, an 8bit JPEG isn’t going to cut it. H.265 for stills will offer tiny files sizes and massive resolutions, whilst moving away from 8bit to 10bit for smoother gradation and colour.

    It is all funny, but this is just LOL.

  • @Vitaliy_Kiselev

    I totally agree, although he writes interesting articles from time to time, I've seen a lot of technical aberrations to.

  • This is my first conversion of a Gh2 AVCHD file converted to x265 4:4:4 10bit file; it plays with latest vlc-2.1.2 compare quality vs size, it looks very promising

    AVCHD https://drive.google.com/file/d/0By9PGWszlX-zUG13WHlibTV2cE0/edit?usp=sharing

    x265 https://drive.google.com/file/d/0By9PGWszlX-zWTFBQl9HNnoyLUE/edit?usp=sharing

  • I have done some testing with h265 using cinec on some BMCC prores stuff and I was blown away. A 1gb file would be converted to a couple MB with basically no loss.

    @sangye shoot raw, edit/grade, export max quality, convert to h265 ; )

  • any idea when this will become widely supported? It sounds freaking amazing.

  • @bimdas

    I suppose quite soon. And pirates together with TV chipset manufacturers will be ahead again :-)

  • I see that Cinec is available for PC only, do those of us on OSX suites have any options to experiment with h.265 encoding?

  • Almost forgot. All top Chinese phones will have H.265 hardware decoding support (up to 1080p30) as new MTK chipset has it. They start shipping in December or so.

  • @JuMo If you feel comfortable with command lines (in osx) you can try this :

    https://bitbucket.org/multicoreware/x265/wiki/Home

  • @luxis Cool thank you, hopefully I'll have some time to give it a try this coming week!

  • image

    Slide from AMD developers conference stating that new APUs will have support for H.265 .

    monopod19.jpg
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  • Thanks to hardware 4K HEVC (high efficiency video coding), the Snapdragon 805 can decode and stream high-quality video without using much power.

  • 4K HEVC Technology

    Panasonic is developing a video codec enabling equal or better picture quality compared to standard encoders at 1/20th the processing time, while still being compliant with the HEVC international standard specifications expected for 4K video transmission. A demonstration of this will be carried out at the Panasonic booth. As one of the core technologies of 4K video transmission, HEVC technology can increase the value of 4K video by improving the connectivity of devices and the convenience of sharing content between devices. In the future, Panasonic will expand this HEVC technology and enable high quality video transmission even on low speed communications lines.

    Huh.

  • The SMP8756 family includes the HEVC compression standard with a high performance ARM (News - Alert) Cortex A9 CPU with an ARM Mali 400 GPU, with a unique combination of performance, user experience and video quality.

    The Sigma SMP8756 will be first shown at CES 2014. The series SoCs supports HEVC's Main-10 profile allowing processing of up to 10 bit color samples accepted as the standard for 4Kx2K, OTT (over the top) and IPTV (News - Alert) content.

    The SMP8750 family will support FHD and 4kx2k resolutions.

    Mustafa Ozgen, vice president and general manager Home Multimedia for Sigma Designs, said in a statement, "Sigma has a heritage of incorporating cutting edge CODECs and with the new 8756 family ushers in Sigma's support for HEVC. We developed our HEVC core to scale from FHD to 4k for the entire family of SoCs. The SMP8756 is specifically designed to bring HEVC into client and multi-room DVR set top boxes at an affordable cost."

    http://it.tmcnet.com/topics/it/articles/2014/01/07/365668-sigmas-smp8756-new-arm-based-chipset-family-with.htm

  • The documents on Daala look much more substantial and promising than I would have expected from the bold claims they've been announced with :-)

    (And ~20 years after having used lifting filters for audio processing in research projects myself, I am happy to see that this very useful class of filters becomes utilized for video processing now, too.)

    Regarding the Panasonic claim:

    Panasonic is developing a video codec enabling equal or better picture quality compared to standard encoders at 1/20th the processing time, while still being compliant with the HEVC international standard specifications expected for 4K video transmission.
    

    This is not difficult to achieve: They do not claim to achieve the "equal or better picture quality" at the same compression ratio than the original. Once you're ok with spending more bandwidth (which is always a good idea for recording video in cameras) you can just skip many of the more computationally expensive options HEVC includes.

  • Once you're ok with spending more bandwidth (which is always a good idea for recording video in cameras) you can just skip many of the more computationally expensive options HEVC includes.

    OF course. All first and second generation hardware encoders will be weak, can be even worse than H.264.

  • DENVER, CO, US – 16 January 2014) – MPEG LA, LLC announced today that a group of 25 companies have agreed on HEVC license terms expected to issue as part of an HEVC Patent Portfolio License in early 2014. A summary is attached. Final agreements are yet to be concluded.

    Full list of parasites:

    • Apple Inc.
    • British Broadcasting Corporation
    • Cisco Technology, Inc.
    • Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) of Korea
    • Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft zur Foerderung der angewandten Forschung e.V.
    • Hitachi Maxell, Ltd.
    • HUMAX Co., Ltd.
    • JVC KENWOOD Corporation
    • KT Corp.
    • LG Electronics Inc.
    • M&K Holdings Inc.
    • NEC Corporation
    • Nippon Hoso Kyokai
    • Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation
    • NTT DOCOMO, INC.
    • Orange SA
    • Siemens AG
    • SK Telecom
    • Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson
    • Thomson Licensing
    • Vidyo, Inc.

    http://www.mpegla.com/main/pid/HEVC/default.aspx